My Favorite Bowie Moment

The tributes are rolling in — both from famous folks and people more like, er, you know, you and me. The outpouring of grief and celebration is interesting, because there wasn’t just one defining “moment” with David Bowie. In fact, that’s what likely makes David Bowie so unique. Art is up for interpretation and it is highly subjective. Music is like that. Bowie, however, was on a completely different plane and planet. Michael Jackson had “Thriller.” Madonna had “Like A Virgin.” But Bowie had, well, everything. Bowie’s “hits” are one thing, but the body of work was so consistently good and interesting, that there was never a true “moment” but a continuum that is something otherworldly. That said, I do have a favorite Bowie moment. When music (or art, for that matter) makes me stop everything that I’m doing and demands my full focus, then I would count that as a moment. I felt that way at one of Outkast’s last shows. Same thing at LCD Soundsystem’s swan song. In 1985, in a huge stadium in Philadelphia, my world stood still as David Bowie came on stage (via video uplink — I think that’s what it was called back then) in London to sing “Heroes.” I remember it like it was yesterday and it will still have the same impact on me forever: chills. There’s really nothing else to say — there’s only this “moment” to enjoy for now, and countless others for eternity....

Senseless In Oregon

By now, most of you have probably heard about the senseless mall shooting here in Oregon. And never, in a million years, would one ever think that they would be touched by something like this. One of the victims yesterday, Steve Forsyth, was a colleague and friend. During my time at Entercom, he was unconditionally supportive. He was bright and funny. He encouraged me to stretch and to always “go for it” creatively. In 2007, after I left, he mentioned that he was thinking of following suit. I said,’ “Dude, do it! You’ll be perfect at this.” And he was. Steve was built to be one of the best in marketing out here. But he was built to be a loving, caring human being first. Most importantly, he was an amazing husband and father. And my thoughts, prayers and love are with his family. There really isn’t anything else to say here at this point — other than I hope that you keep the people who you love and care about close to you. And tell them how much they mean to you....

Dear Advertisers, No Assembly Required = A Sale This Holiday

It is flat-out Griswoldian. And something that has played out for parents since the advent of more-than-one-piece toys. The nighttime/early morning assembly. Last Christmas, I spent 90 minutes putting together a Toys ‘R Us Imaginarium train set that I knew was going to become disassembled in under an hour. There were twists and turns. There were tiny little screws. It was one in the morning and even my bright headlamp couldn’t help. This gift from my mom was the one that I knew was going to take every bit of patience. I wished for smaller hands (though I do have pretty small hands). I wished that the box had been lost in the mail for a moment. I wished I was asleep. But duty called. I got the thing put together. Finally. And through the excruciating back pain (this happens after 40, by the way), I was able to take a step back and savor the moment: my first in-depth assembly experience outside of an IKEA run. After a good three hours of sleep, I woke “refreshed” and ready to show my son his new train set. He was thrilled and, to my great surprise, he didn’t tear it down in an hour. It was 70 minutes. I still find little pieces of the thing under couches and in the backs of cabinets. A reminder that a great deal of assembly can result in a great deal of scatter and clutter. So this holiday, I am going to place more emphasis on things that require little or no assembly. And here are some friendly tips to advertisers hoping to woo me with their...

The Fun of Emceeing

Each year, I have the wonderful opportunity to host the Hood to Coast Thirst Thursday event out at Nike. We celebrate the the rich history of the race, now in its 30th year. But to me, it’s more than that — it’s about the amazing people I get to see and meet each year. They come from all over the world. Some of them are competing for the first time. Some of them have been coming back for years. This time around, I interacted with new people from France, Holland, Belgium, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Great Britain, Singapore, Thailand — and Boston. For the record, I have a degree in International Studies. I’d be lying if I said it didn’t help when having conversations with these great folks. It also helps that I’m a bit of a sports nut — especially with the Boston contingent. They were all excited about the opportunity to run the race and it was clear that they were having a great time as they prepared for this grueling, 200-mile piece of Oregon culture and history. And I count myself incredibly lucky that I am able to share some time with all of...